Blog entries

Follow up of IRI conference about Museums and the Web #museoweb

2012/04/12 by Arthur Lutz

I attented the conference organised by IRI in a series of conferences about "Muséologie, muséographie et nouvelles formes d’adresse au public" (hashtag #museoweb). This particular occurence was about "Le Web devient audiovisuel" (the web is also audio and video content). Here are a few notes and links we gathered. The event was organised by Alexandre Monnin @aamonnz.

http://polemictweet.com/2011-2012-museo-audiovisuel/images/slide4_museo_fr.png

Yves Raimond from the BBC

Yves Raimond @moustaki made a presentation about his work at the BBC around semantic web technologies and speech recognition over large quantities of digitized archives. Parts of the BCC web sites use semantic web data as the database and do mashups with external sources of data (musicbrainz, dbpedia, wikipedia). For example Tom Waits has an html web page : http://www.bbc.co.uk/music/artists/c3aeb863-7b26-4388-94e8-5a240f2be21b add .rdf at the end of the URL http://www.bbc.co.uk/music/artists/c3aeb863-7b26-4388-94e8-5a240f2be21b.rdf

He also made an introduction about the ABC-IP The Automatic Broadcast Content Interlinking Project and the Kiwi-API project that uses CMU Sphinx on Amazon Web Services to process large quantities of archives. A screenshot of Kiwi-API is shown on the BBC R&D blog. The code should be open sourced soon and should appear on the BBC R&D github page.

Following his presentation, the question was asked if using Wikipedia content on an institutional web site would be possible in France, I pointed to the use of Wikipedia on http://data.bnf.fr , for example at the bottom of the Victor Hugo page.

Raphaël Troncy about Media Fragments

Raphaël Troncy @rtroncy made a presentation about "Media Fragments" which will enable sharing parts of a video on the web. Two major features : the sharing of specific extracts and the optimization of bandwith use when streaming the extract (usefull for mobile devices for example). It is a W3C working draft : http://www.w3.org/TR/media-frags-reqs/. Here are a few links of demos and players :

Part of the presentation was about the ACAV project done jointly with Dailymotion : http://www.capdigital.com/projet-acav/

The slides of his presentation are available here : http://www.slideshare.net/troncy/addressing-and-annotating-multimedia-fragments

IRI presentation

Vincent Puig @vincentpuig and Raphaël Velt @raphv made a presentation of various projects led by IRI :

http://www.iri.centrepompidou.fr/wp-content/themes/IRI-Theme/images/logo-iri-petit_fr_fr.png

Final words

The technologies seen during this conference are often related to semantic web technologies or at least web standards. Some of the visualizations are quite impressive and could mean new uses of the Web and an inspiration for CubicWeb projects.

A few of the people present at the conference will be attending or presenting talks at SemWeb.Pro which will take place in Paris on the 2nd and 3rd of may 2012.


Brainomics / CrEDIBLE conference report

2013/10/09 by Vincent Michel

Cubicweb and the Brainomics project were presented last week at the CrEDIBLE workshop (October 2-4, 2013, Sophia-Antipolis) on "Federating distributed and heterogeneous biomedical data and knowledge". We would like to thank the organizers for this nice opportunity to show the features of CubicWeb and Brainomics in the context of biomedical data.

http://credible.i3s.unice.fr/lib/tpl/credible/images/credible.png

Workshop highlights

  • A short presentation of SHI3LD that defines data access based on conditions that are based on ASK request. The other part was a state of the art of Open data license, and the (poor) existence of licenses expressed in RDF. Future work seems to be an interesting combination of both SHI3LD and RDF-based licenses for data access.
  • MIDAS, an open-source software for sharing medical data. This project could be an interesting source of inspiration for the file sharing part of CubicWeb, even if the (really complicated in my opinion) case of large files downloads is not addressed for now.
  • Federated queries based on FedX - the optimization techniques based on source selection & exclusive groups seems a good approach for avoiding large data transfers and finding some (sub-)optimal ways to join the different data sources. This should be taken into account in the future work on the "FROM" clause in CubicWeb.
  • WebPIE/QueryPIE: a map-reduce-based approach for large-scale reasoning.

CubicWeb and Brainomics

The slides of the presentation can be download as a PDF or viewed on slideshare.

Some people seem confused on the RQL to SQL translation. This relies on a simple translation logic that is implemented in the rql2sql file. This is only an implementation trick, not so different from the one used in RDBMS-based triplestores that have to convert SPARQL into SQL.

RQL inference : there is no magic behind the RQL inference process. As opposed to triplestores that store RDF triples that contain their own schema, and thus cannot easily know the full data model in these triples without looking at all the triples, RQL relies on a relational database with an fixed (at a given moment) data model, thus allowing inference and simple checks. In particular, in this example, we want All the Cities of `Île de France` with more than 100 000 inhabitants ?, which is expressed in RQL:

Any X WHERE X region Y, X population > 100000,
            Y uri "http://fr.dbpedia.org/resource/Île-de-France"

and SPARQL:

select ?ville where {
?ville db-owl:region <http://fr.dbpedia.org/resource/Île-de-France> .
?ville db-owl:populationTotal ?population .
FILTER (?population > 100000)
}

Beside the fact that RQL is less verbose that SPARQL (syntax matters), the simplicity of RQL relies on the fact that it can automatically infer (similarly to SPARQL) that if X is related to Y by the region relation and has a population attribute, it should be a city. If city and district both have the region relation and a population attribute, the RQL inference allows to fetch them both transparently, otherwise one can be specific by using the is relation:

Any X WHERE X is City, X region Y, X population > 100000,
            Y uri "http://fr.dbpedia.org/resource/Île-de-France"

RQL also allows subqueries, union, full-text search, stored procedures, ... (see the doc).

These really interesting discussions convinced us that we should write a journal paper for detailing the theoretical and technical concepts behind RQL and the YAMS schema.