blog entries created by Nicolas Chauvat
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  • CubicWeb Sprint report for the "BugSquash" team

    2012/03/16 by Nicolas Chauvat

    Beginners fixed core bugs

    The first day of the CubicWeb sprint was dedicated to an introduction to a group of four beginners that included two people that do not work at Logilab. At the end of day, this team knew about Entity, Views and Schema and was ready to dive into the core in order to squash some bugs.

    The first steps into the CubicWeb core were not so easy, but these brave beginners, assisted by a skilled developer, managed to fix some bugs and add a few useful features, including one from a windows user that made it into the stable branch.

    The gen-static-datadir command

    We had a look at cubicweb-ctl gen-static-datadir, a feature that copies in a directory all the files that could be cached by a "front" web server instead of being served by cubicweb.

    Testing the feature

    At first run, we found that not all files where copied. We alas were unable to reproduce. So we need to keep an eye on this. On next tests, we tried several configuration. The files that were copied were always the ones containd in the "deepest" cube in the tree of cubes. So we can say that the command is working well.

    Approach used by the feature

    In the code, we browse all cubes used by the master cube to gather all filenames that we want to copy and afterwards we use "config.locate_resource(resource)" to find the best location for this file.

    Doing this, we sometimes copy a file from the cache. If we do not want to use the cache, we could be sort the cubes recursively copy the whole data folder and sometimes overwrite files with files located nearer to the master cube.

    New option

    We added a -r option that erases the target directory before launching the command.


  • CubicWeb sprint in Paris - 2012/02/07-10

    2011/12/21 by Nicolas Chauvat

    Topics

    To be decided. Some possible topics are :

    • optimization (still)
    • porting cubicweb to python3
    • porting cubicweb to pypy
    • persistent sessions
    • finish twisted / wsgi refactoring
    • inter-instance communication bus
    • use subprocesses to handle datafeeds
    • developing more debug-tools (debug console, view profiling, etc.)
    • pluggable / unpluggable external sources (as needed for the cubipedia and semantic family)
    • client-side only applications (javascript + http)
    • mercurial storage backend: see this thread of the mailing list
    • mercurial-server integration: see this email to the mailing list

    other ideas are welcome, please bring them up on cubicweb@lists.cubicweb.org

    Location

    This sprint will take place from in february 2012 from tuesday the 7th to friday the 10th. You are more than welcome to come along, help out and contribute. An introduction is planned for newcomers.

    Network resources will be available for those bringing laptops.

    Address : 104 Boulevard Auguste-Blanqui, Paris. Ring "Logilab" (googlemap)

    Metro : Glacière

    Contact : http://www.logilab.fr/contact

    Dates : 07/02/2012 to 10/02/2012


  • CubicWeb gets press coverage at SemanticWeb.com

    2010/08/15 by Nicolas Chauvat

    Following the presentation of CubicWeb at OSCON 2010 in July, the editor of SemanticWeb.com wrote an article describing the CubicWeb framwork. Read the article and ask your questions on the mailing list!


  • CubicWeb documentation sprint in feb. 2010

    2010/01/22 by Nicolas Chauvat
    http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3042/2871708248_950831962c_s.jpg

    On February 2nd, 2010 Logilab will host in its head offices a one-day sprint dedicated to the improvement of the CubicWeb documentation.

    Get in touch with Logilab if you want to participate in person or via the net: contact at logilab dot fr.

    Photo by Adam Hyde from the FLOSS blog


  • Browsing the Semantic Web

    2009/10/31 by Nicolas Chauvat
    http://www.cubicweb.org/file/502157?vid=download

    Now that the Web of Data has become a reality, innovative applications are springing up everywhere. Here is a selection of web apps that help you browse the semantic web.

    • Parallax is a faceted browser that is demonstrated by displaying the content of Freebase.
    • Neofonie demonstrates its faceted browser by displaying the content of DBpedia at dbpedia.neofonie.de
    • VisiNav is a search engine that allows to refine searches in a way that reminds of facets.
    • Falcons is a search engine that indexes RDF data.
    • Sindice is a search engine that indexes RDF data as well as data extracted from Microformats. It offers public Sindice API that can be used to retrieve the search results as RDF, json or Atom.
    • SameAs is a service that returns all the equivalent URIs for a search term or a given URI.
    • When you enter search terms, Sig.ma collates the data from the resources included in the results of a search on Sindice.
    • When you publish your product data according to the GoodRelations ontology, informations like the price show up in Yahoo's search results.

    More and more services will appear in the coming months that make use of these new resources. Just for tagging, you may look at CommonTag, Zemanta and OpenCalais and imagine new ways to automate and facilitate the process of publishing information on the web.


  • Comparing CubicWeb with Drupal plus CCK extension

    2009/10/29 by Nicolas Chauvat
    http://www.cubicweb.org/file/502151?vid=download

    Drupal is a CMS written in PHP that is getting more and more visibility in the Semantic Web crowd. Several researchers from DERI have been using it as a test bed for their research projects and developed extensions to showcase their ideas. It is for example used to build the Semantic Web Dog Food site that archives the semantic web conferences and publishes them as Linked Open Data. The URL for this year's ISWC is http://data.semanticweb.org/conference/iswc/2009

    This led me to read more about Drupal than I had had the incentive before. I have not had time to give it a try, but I skimmed the documentation and will try to compare it with CubicWeb from a software architecture point of view.

    Drupal defines a Node as an information item. The CCK (aka Content Construction Kit) can be used to define new types of Nodes thru a web interface. Nodes and the bits and pieces used to display them as HTML are not packed together in components. The Features extension is planning on getting this bits packaged.

    If you are a Drupal user/developer and think I am not being fair to Drupal, please comment below.

    On the other hand, CubicWeb has implemented very early the concept of reusable component. What is called a Node in Drupal is an Entity in CubicWeb. By design, CubicWeb does not have a web interface to define entities. The data model is part of the code. To efficiently maintain applications in production, changes to the data model must be tracked with changes to the code. Data model changes imply migration procedures. In CubicWeb, all of this is versionned and made part of the components. Where Drupal needs to grow extensions like CCK and Features, CubicWeb has more advanced possibilities by design, for example the ability to develop featurefull applications by assembling components.

    This was a very short comparison. I'm looking forward to getting a chance of discussing it with knowledgeable Drupal hackers.


  • CubicWeb at BayPiggies/OSCON in July 2009

    2009/07/14 by Nicolas Chauvat
    http://www.logilab.org/file/9631?vid=download

    I am pleased to announce that CubicWeb will be presented during a BayPIGgies meeting that will exceptionally take place in the OSCON conference building as the closing event of the Bird of Feathers on July 23rd at 8pm.

    Joins us to get to know more about CubicWeb.

    Read the report.


  • INSEE, XML and RDF

    2009/07/06 by Nicolas Chauvat
    http://insee.fr/fr/css/images/logo_insee.gif

    I discovered that the French Institute for Statistics and Economic Studies (INSEE) has published part of its data as XML and RDF:

    We will try to put that data to good use.


  • CubicWeb for DBPedia and OpenLibrary at PyConFr'09

    2009/06/05 by Nicolas Chauvat
    http://www.cubicweb.org/file/343602?vid=download

    I presented CubicWeb at the French Python Conference held in Paris last week-end. Check out the slides and the video. See also my recent post Fetching book descriptions and covers on logilab.org.

    The code used during the demo uses the brand new RangeFacet, DateRangeFacet and HasRelationFacet brought by CubicWeb 3.3 and is available in the cubes dbpedia and book. We will put the demos online in a couple weeks once we get a new server with more horsepower. Help would be welcome to set them up as Amazon EC2 or Eucalyptus instances.


  • Presenting results with different views

    2009/03/22 by Nicolas Chauvat

    This article is part of the endless "you are never the only one experimenting with what sounds like a good idea". Just compare the following links:

    The MIT Simile project produced the Exhibit mega-js-widget:

    Google ran an experiment with alternate views for search results:

    • Location of PGA Tour tournaments
    • Evolution of nanotechnologies over time
    • Images in search results (click on Images on the right)

    CubicWeb has built-in support for applying views to a selection of objects:

    • Impressionism paintings in the museums of Normandy (click on the tabs)

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