Blog entries

  • CubicWeb 3.8 released

    2010/04/28 by Sylvain Thenault

    CubicWeb 3.8.0 went out last week, but now we have tested it, produced a 3.8.1, it's show time!

    What's new in CubicWeb 3.8?

    One of the most important change is http server update to move from deadend twisted.web2 to twisted.web. With this change comes the possibility to configure the maximum size of POST request in the configuration file (was hard-coded to 100Mo before).

    Other changes include:

    • CubicWeb should now be installable through pip or easy_install. This is still experimental, and we don't use it that much so please, give us some feedback! Some cubes are now also "pipable" (comment, blog...), but more will come with new releases.
    • .execute() function lost its cache key argument. This is great news since it was a pain to explain and most cubicweb users didn't know how to handle it well (and I'm thre greatest beneficer since I won't have to explain over and over again)
    • nicer schema and workflow views
    • refactored web session handling, which should now be cleaner, clearer, hence less buggy...
    • nicer skeleton generation for new cubes, cleaner __pkginfo__ (you don't have to define both __depends__ / __depends_cubes__ or __recommends__ / __recommends_cubes__ in the general case, and other cleanups)

    Enjoy!


  • CubicWeb Sprint report for the "WSGI" team

    2012/02/20 by Pierre-Yves David

    Cubicweb has had WSGI support for several years, but this support was incomplete.

    The WSGI team was in charge of turning WSGI support into a full featured backend that could replace Twisted in real production scenarii.

    Because we only had first class support for Twisted, some of the CubicWeb logic related to HTTP handling was implemented on the twisted side with twisted concepts. Our first task was to move this logic in CubicWeb itself. The handling of HTTP status in our response was improved in the process.

    Our second task was to focus on the "non-HTTP" part of CubicWeb (because the repository also manages background tasks). The developement mode for WSGI is now able to handle and run such tasks. For this purpose we have begun a process that aims to remove server related code from the repository object.

    We also Tested several WSGI middleware. One of the most promising is Firepython, integrating python logging and debugging feature with Firebug. werkzeug debugger seems neat too.

    http://www.cubicweb.org/file/2194267?vid=download

    All these improvements open the road to a simple and efficient multi-process architecture in CubicWeb.